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Using the Grain Tool

Add an analog texture with Grain.

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What is Grain?

Grain is a simulation of the random noise pattern that naturally occurs with film. Images with film are created with millions of tiny silver particles, or “grains”, but they don’t always act uniformly and this creates the grain effect.

Originally, this was an undesirable effect that film manufacturers tried to minimize. With the advent of ever-improving digital cameras, noise has now largely become less of a concern, but many have discovered that their images feel sterile without the grain that film possessed.

Modern smartphone cameras work hard to remove noise from images, but a perfectly noiseless image is not always the most emotive. Thus, the Grain toolmceclip0.jpg allows you to add a film-like grain onto your digital images.

Where it is:

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Why would you use it?

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If you’re using one of the Film X Presets, adding a touch of grain can help increase the realism of the film effect.

Grain can also increase the amount of perceived detail in an image, which is especially beneficial for out-of-focus or blurry image.

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 Above, the focus was missed and the subject's hand is in focus instead of their face. A bit of the grain tool gives the face some perceived detail that solves the problem.

 

Images with large areas of one flat color, such as blue skies and walls, can also take on a more interesting character with just a hint of grain. Black & White photos are also great candidates for the texture grain provides as this is a very classic film look.

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Tips & Tricks:

1. The Grain toolmceclip0.jpg is typically used subtly, especially on color images. Try pushing it to the point where it looks obviously too strong, and then dial it back. However, there are no rules here.

2. Pinch to zoom in to see the effect of the Grain tool in better detail.

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3. The visibility of grain in your image will depend on the size it is being displayed at. The editor is a good indicator of how the grain will look when viewed on other phone screens, but the grain may look stronger if printed or viewed on a larger screen.